Blogging about crafts, TV shows (BtVS, AtS, SPN, TW, OitNB & others), film (sci-fi, horror, expressionist and 80s coming of age themed), art, design, architecture, sociology AND especialy cross-sections of all of the above!
Most things are reblogged but the odd post is my own. :)

 

lullabelleno:

heroes-get-made:

“This isn’t your typical love story…” opens the trailer for a movie about a white, heterosexual, cisgender, able-bodied, middle class, and likely loosely Christian couple who find each other through serendipity and a very small amount of actual work.

  (via fourofthem)

traceexcalibur:

"talking about sexism or racism on Tumblr doesn’t solve anything"

really? because I am absolutely certain that I am a better, less bigoted person than I was a few years ago and that is most certainly due to the people I met and things I read on Tumblr

perhaps it doesn’t do anything for the worst of the worst but there are still plenty of people who do learn from impassioned Tumblr posts

ilivebetweenconcretewalls:

sparkamovement:

Olympics struggle with ‘policing femininity’:

There are female athletes who will be competing at the Olympic Games this summer after undergoing treatment to make them less masculine.
Still others are being secretly investigated for displaying overly manly characteristics, as sport’s highest medical officials attempt to quantify — and regulate — the hormonal difference between male and female athletes.
Caster Semenya, the South African runner who was so fast and muscular that many suspected she was a man, exploded onto the front pages three years ago. She was considered an outlier, a one-time anomaly.
But similar cases are emerging all over the world, and Semenya, who was banned from competition for 11 months while authorities investigated her sex, is back, vying for gold.
Semenya and other women like her face a complex question: Does a female athlete whose body naturally produces unusually high levels of male hormones, allowing them to put on more muscle mass and recover faster, have an “unfair” advantage?
In a move critics call “policing femininity,” recent rule changes by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), the governing body of track and field, state that for a woman to compete, her testosterone must not exceed the male threshold.
If it does, she must have surgery or receive hormone therapy prescribed by an expert IAAF medical panel and submit to regular monitoring. So far, at least a handful of athletes — the figure is confidential — have been prescribed treatment, but their numbers could increase. Last month, the International Olympic Committee began the approval process to adopt similar rules for the Games.

There’s a lot going on here, but here’s what jumped out at us immediately: Women, particularly women athletes, are constantly told they’re not as strong or fast as men—and now that they’re proving otherwise, they’re being forced to undergo hormone treatments. We don’t think it’s a coincidence that women of color are coming under fire for this more than white women. From the article: “Lindsay Perry, another scientist, says sometimes whole teams of African women are dead ringers for men.” This is a clear example of how we’ve constructed a very particular, very narrow ideal of femininity and womanhood that devalues and casts aside black women in particular.

Ugh Ugh Ugh Ugh Ugh

ilivebetweenconcretewalls:

sparkamovement:

Olympics struggle with ‘policing femininity’:

There are female athletes who will be competing at the Olympic Games this summer after undergoing treatment to make them less masculine.

Still others are being secretly investigated for displaying overly manly characteristics, as sport’s highest medical officials attempt to quantify — and regulate — the hormonal difference between male and female athletes.

Caster Semenya, the South African runner who was so fast and muscular that many suspected she was a man, exploded onto the front pages three years ago. She was considered an outlier, a one-time anomaly.

But similar cases are emerging all over the world, and Semenya, who was banned from competition for 11 months while authorities investigated her sex, is back, vying for gold.

Semenya and other women like her face a complex question: Does a female athlete whose body naturally produces unusually high levels of male hormones, allowing them to put on more muscle mass and recover faster, have an “unfair” advantage?

In a move critics call “policing femininity,” recent rule changes by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), the governing body of track and field, state that for a woman to compete, her testosterone must not exceed the male threshold.

If it does, she must have surgery or receive hormone therapy prescribed by an expert IAAF medical panel and submit to regular monitoring. So far, at least a handful of athletes — the figure is confidential — have been prescribed treatment, but their numbers could increase. Last month, the International Olympic Committee began the approval process to adopt similar rules for the Games.

There’s a lot going on here, but here’s what jumped out at us immediately: Women, particularly women athletes, are constantly told they’re not as strong or fast as men—and now that they’re proving otherwise, they’re being forced to undergo hormone treatments. We don’t think it’s a coincidence that women of color are coming under fire for this more than white women. From the article: “Lindsay Perry, another scientist, says sometimes whole teams of African women are dead ringers for men.” This is a clear example of how we’ve constructed a very particular, very narrow ideal of femininity and womanhood that devalues and casts aside black women in particular.

Ugh Ugh Ugh Ugh Ugh

oldbookillustrations:

Before we too into the dust descend.
René Bull, from Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, rendered into English by Edward FitzGerald, London, 1913.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Before we too into the dust descend.

René Bull, from Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, rendered into English by Edward FitzGerald, London, 1913.

(Source: archive.org)

Things No Longer Relevant

wintherharlekin:

Scandinavian folklore (special focus on Norway)

Pictures:
Nøkken, Valemon, and Draugen by Theodor Kittelsen
Dragon, Huldra, Trolls, Elves, (first picture), by John Bauer
Fossegrimen by http://birgitte-gustavsen.deviantart.com/art/Fossegrimen-160045627
Kraken by Bob Eggleton

Body Conscious at Craft in America

ellenschinderman:

Body Conscious at Craft in America

image

I could not be prouder to a part of this amazing show, opening this Saturday (August 23rd) at Craft in America, and I’m terribly excited to give my first ever artist’s talk at 4:30pm! Also speaking Saturday is the super talented Luke Haynes (who was in February’s, “Stitch Fetish 2.”)!
So if you happen to be in LA on Saturday afternoon, come by and say hello, and check out this fantastic show.
If…

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therhumboogie:

By Yumi Okita, these gorgeous hand embroidered moths are deceptively large with some reaching almost a foot wide, the technical sewing skills you can see on the wings are perfection and such beautiful variety.